Why Presidential Politics Is Meaningless To Your Future


Why Presidential Politics Is Meaningless To Your Future

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In 1620 William Bradford and the rest of the Mayflower Pilgrims stepped foot on Plymouth Rock and so began the journey of America, a great nation that fought, scratched, and clawed its way to worldwide relevance.

The Pilgrims, our ancestors, made the treacherous journey across the Atlantic Ocean in search of a dream, a hope for freedom and prosperity for themselves and their families. At the time, their move was radical and extremely risky, but they decided to make America their new home and began to build the foundation of what would someday become the United States.

The early American pioneers didn’t have a government, a congress, a judicial system or a President.  They had each other and depended on one another for safety and security.  Families became the backbone of their communities and people supported one another.

My parents live in Loogootee, Indiana, in the heart of Amish Country.  The Amish community built my parents’ home and in the process became their friends.  I’ve learned a lot about the Amish the past decade and have come to respect their perspective in life.  In a way, they still live with the principles made famous by early American settlers.

A few years ago, a tornado destroyed several homes within the Amish community.  Many families lost their homes and farms as result.  The Amish community turned down government assistance and instead united together and slowly rebuilt everyone’s home.  They weren’t bailed out by FEMA or supported by any government agency or governmental assistance program, they were neighbors helping one another.

The Amish don’t have traditional health insurance, they don’t accept Social Security.  When one of their neighbors are in need, they pool their resources and support one another.  The Amish don’t vote in elections, in fact, many Amish don’t even know who is running for President, because in the end, they know it will have no effect on their lives.

When I turn on the news or scan Facebook, I observe strong opinions and emotions surrounding our Presidential election.  So many are invested emotionally in a single man or woman obtaining this office and many put their hopes and dreams on the back of the person that will hold that office.  Don’t get me wrong, the office of the President is necessary and plays an important role in our society, but it doesn’t relieve everyday Americans of our basic duty and responsibilities to each other.

America is great not because of a president, but because of its people.  America is great because of the people that get up every day, in spite of their health, their fears, or family situations, to build our roads, to respond to our fires, keep our streets safe, teach our children, or create commerce to keep our economy strong.

We must never forget that America was built on the foundation of strong families, strong communities, and neighbors willing to help and support one another long after the hoopla of a presidential election dies down.

Yes, vote for your candidate this fall, but do so to keep our institution going, not because you hope this person will change anything in your life that truly matters or will redefine what it means to be an American.

What can you do for your neighbor today that will honor those that came before you?  How will you be an American today?

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6 comments

  1. Ringing true – the Amish are a strong people…I knew your parents have a bond with the Amish.
    This is a good one, Erick

    Reply
    1. Thanks, Joyce. The Amish give me perspective. Great people, awesome neighbors!

      Reply
  2. Amen brother.
    Jesus said, “This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.” John 15:12

    Reply
    1. Well put, Tony!

      Reply
  3. America was at its greatest when the people looked to God and their community for help. Now when something bad happens the first question asked is, “What is the government going to do about it”? It would be nice if instead Americans thought, “What am I going to do about it”?

    Reply
    1. Hey Joy, great thoughts, thank you! I still there are a lot of folks like what you describe, ones that take ownership and support one another. It just doesn’t get a lot of press. I’m encouraged by what I personally experience in our community.

      Reply

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